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I am going to Lapland! July 16, 2014

Posted by Jenny in bushwhacking, camping, hiking, travel.
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14 comments
In Sarek National Park (Wikimedia image)

In Sarek National Park (Wikimedia image)

In a week I depart for Sweden. I fly Asheville-Chicago-Stockholm—I was amazed I could do it with just one connection. I spend a day in Stockholm and take an overnight train, an 18-hour ride, to a place called Ritsem on the border of Sarek National Park. I backpack with a group for nine days, going through valleys and making side trips to climb a few peaks. There are no trails in Sarek. Now you know why I was interested!

This expedition is organized by a British company called Nature Travels that specializes in adventurous trips in Sweden and Norway. They say the groups going to Sarek typically include quite a few Scandinavians. It is difficult even for Swedes to navigate through the park unassisted.

I ‘ll have one more good hike before I go, leading a Smoky Mountains Hiking Club outing up No Name Ridge, and I depart next week. I return early August—spending another day in Stockholm before flying home.

The park has many glaciers—you see in the photo a typical braided river, tinted blue from glacial silt, flowing through a U-shaped valley. Stream crossings are a major challenge. I hope to see reindeer and bears. We will have about 22 hours a day of sunlight. The whole thing is nearly impossible for me to imagine.

But I am sure of one thing—it will be amazing.

Location  of Sarek

Location of Sarek

 

Panthertown backpack July 3, 2014

Posted by Jenny in camping, hiking, Nantahala National Forest, Pisgah National Forest, Southern Appalachians.
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8 comments
Pothole Falls.

Pothole Falls.

Last weekend I went backpacking in Panthertown with my new friends Dana and Cathy. The plan was to meet Friday morning, camp two nights, and come out Sunday. We had no set itinerary—just the desire to wander about ethereal realms of granite plutons and splendid waterfalls. Plus, Dana had a really good tip about a beautiful place to camp, not far from the Cold Mountain Road entrance.

Panthertown is located south of Sylva NC and west of Brevard NC. It is considered to be partly in Nantahala National Forest and partly in Pisgah NF.

As it turned out, we got rained on pretty hard a few hours after we arrived. In some ways that was bad luck, but in one way it was nice—we got to see some of the waterfalls foaming and roaring from the heavy rainfall. I opted to leave Saturday morning because I had aggravated a chronic hip flexor problem two days earlier on a bushwhack up Cole Creek and it was really bothering me. Dana and Cathy opted to leave Saturday evening because everything was so wet and dirty by that point that it made sense to go home and dry off.

We started by going up the Mac’s Gap Trail to the Greenland Creek Trail and turning northwest to go along a pretty rough pathway to see a couple of falls. There were lots of roots and rocks and steep little climbs, but that’s what Panthertown is all about. First we came to Mac’s Falls.

It was jungly along the edge of the stream.

It was jungly along the edge of the stream.

Mac's Falls from downstream. Peaceful.

Mac’s Falls from downstream. Peaceful.

A little further along we came to Pothole Falls.

Pothole Falls.

Pothole Falls.

We headed back upstream and located the camping spot Dana had heard about. It was just perfect, carpeted with pine needles and right beside the amber waters of Greenland Creek. There was even a tiny beach area with very fine grains of sand.

The only problem was that at this point it was pouring—just as we were trying to set up our tents. I was in such a hurry to get my tent up that when I yanked it out of its stuff sack, the little bag with the tent pegs went flying into the brush and I didn’t even see it go. Then, when I couldn’t find the pegs, I figured I’d left them behind the last time I used the tent. Dana and Cathy had extras which they kindly loaned me. Dana spotted the little bag when they broke camp.

After we got things set up, the rain tapered off and we explored the three falls upstream from there. First was Greenland Creek Falls.

Beautiful the way the Panthertown falls are all fringed with luxuriant green.

Beautiful the way the Panthertown falls are all fringed with luxuriant green.

The water was churning and foaming from the rain. To me, it had a strangely industrial sound, as if subterranean machinery was busily at work. I remember saying to the others, “It sounds like a machine,” but I couldn’t quite explain what I meant.

The fogging on my lens got worse as I went along. Well, at least it gives you a feel for how damp things were.

Raging waters.

Raging waters.

Patterns of foam below Halfway Falls.

Patterns of foam below Halfway Falls.

This rhodo blossom wanted to be admired.

This rhodo blossom wanted to be admired.

We came to the uppermost of the falls, Carlton’s Falls.

Contrast between white foam and dark amber pool.

Contrast between white foam and dark amber pool.

I took a picture of Dana and Cathy. Unfortunately, the fogged-up lens turned Cathy into a ghost.

Dana and Cathy with fog on the lens.

Dana and Cathy with fog on the lens.

We returned to camp and had supper. Afterward, I wandered up and down Greenland Creek a short distance and gazed at the beautiful stream.

There is no other place quite like Panthertown.

Carlton's Falls.

Carlton’s Falls.

 

What “public domain” means June 30, 2014

Posted by Jenny in Internet images, photography, public domain, publishing.
6 comments
Rosebay rhododendron.

Rosebay rhododendron.

I am going to put this message up maybe twice a year. It’s kind of a lost cause, and I don’t want to annoy my blog followers, so I’ll leave it up for a day or so and take it back down.

I’m not such a great photographer, so it amazes me when I see through my blog stats that someone is searching for something like “public domain rosebay rhododendron” and comes to my site. Sometimes people click on every single photo with a post I’ve done, and I know then that they are doing some sort of copying of my information.

Public domain is complicated, but generally right now in the U.S. any image or text published after 1924 is not in the public domain. (I’m not quite that old, thank you.) Here’s the idea behind it: Someone who creates text or image deserves a certain amount of credit and unique use of it for quite a while. How would you feel if you drew a picture and then other people started immediately using it for their own purposes?

I met a woman not long ago who said, “Anything that’s put up on the Internet is up for grabs. I mean, why else would you put it there?”

I was sitting with her in a room with a group of people and I had to really restrain myself from getting angry.  So, if I take my own photo and post it on the Internet, someone else can take it and use it on their own site without attribution?

The Internet is complicated as far as sharing info is concerned. I don’t know what the story is with Facebook sharing of text or photos, because I decided a long time ago I was never going to get on Facebook (or other social media). All I know is, I pay very close attention to the OWNERSHIP of photos and text, and I do my best to respect it. I never use photos on this site other than my own, ones in public domain (mainly from Wikimedia Commons), and ones that I have specially obtained permission to use.

Thank you for listening.

 

 

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